Skip to main content

About your Search

WHUT (Howard University Television) 8
English 92
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 92 (some duplicates have been removed)
disaster in the making in japan after a new blast rocks a new power plant there. also a deadly tour bus crash in new york and conflicting reports from the driver and passengers. this while we try to get to the bottom of what really happened. and rebel fighters hammered in libya as forces loyal to qaddhafi use warplanes to bomb stra taoepbl i can conditions. it's all now and live and "happening now" "happening now." we're go glad you are with us on this very busy monday morning. hi, everybody i'm jenna lee? i'm jon scott. "happening now" a new explosion at a japanese nuclear power plant raises fears of an all out meltdown. the fallout from that could reach across the pacific affectth west coast of the u.s. more powerful after shocks rocked japan today. a thousand bodies wash ashore on the devastated northeast coast of the country. raising the death toll officially now lis listed as tad 9.0 and the tsunami that hit just half wards. the details get worse by the day. >> reporter: absolutely. it's completely unbelievable. every day i go out it gets worse than the day before. i went down by t
by the moment in japan as more radiation is spewing in the atmosphere from the damaged nuclear plant. david piper in the air base west of tokyo. good morning, david. >> martha: the nuclear crisis is a dangerous level now. the fukushima nuclear complex has had a number of a explosion and they are saying it is moving to a dangerous level and the international nuclear agency said that fire started in a storage plant that spent nuclear fuel. japanese officials told them the fire was out now because they reportedly had help from the u.s. military. radiation leveled have sored around the complex. japanese authorities told people to seal doors and winnows and stay in home and avoid going out at all. japanese prime minister said radiation is released from the three reactors from the nuclear plant and a high risk of more radiation coming out. reactors are over heat raising the risk. japan has imposed a no fly zone over the plant. high levels of radiation in tokyo and now reportedly dropping. but just outside of tokyo there are above the normal level by 10 times. back to you in the studio. >> martha:
spread to other parts of japan. it does not appear that it poses any threat to either hawaii or territories or the rest of the united states. >>> andrea mitchell just sat down with secretary of state hillary clinton in cairo. what she says about the crisis in japan, the wave of revolutions in the middle east and her surprise stop today in tahrir square. >> it's very exciting and very moving. and to see where this revolution happened and all that it has meantรง to the world is extraordinary for me. >>> also this hour, our exclusive with senator kirsten gillibrand. what she's calling on the president to do in terms of ending the war in afghanistan. >>> good day, everybody, i'm nora o'donnell live in washington. andrea's completed interview is straight ahead. >>> we begin with japan. first the human toll. six days after the quake and tsunami, the official figures stand at 4,164 dead. 7,843 missing. the total now more than 12,000. at the fukushima nuclear plant, workers are desperately trying to cool the reactors. two reactors are believed to have been damaged. two more are at r
americans who are in japan it is time to consider getting out today, thursday, march 17th, 2011. >> from nbc news, this is a special edition of "today," disaster in japan with matt lauer and meredith vieira. live from studio 1a in rockefeller plaza. >> good morning. welcome to "today" on a thursday morning. i'm matt lauer. >> i'm savannah guthrie in for meredith who is on assignment. a sign of how desperate things are in japan that they are willing to try such a long shot. helicopters dropping water from the air. >> want to take a look at the video right now. as you can see when they do that a significant amount of that water seems to be dispersed by the wind. now massive high pressure water cannons, the kind you have seen police use on rioters will be used to hoes dose down the reac from the ground. more on this desperate attempt just ahead. >>> growing disagreement today between officials in japan and here in the u.s. over the severity of the situation. the chair of the u.s. regulatory commission believes a storage pool holding highly radioactive spent fuel rods may be completely empty at
to "washington journal" on this wednesday, march 16, 2011. the latest from japan -- "the new york times" headline -- "second reactor may have ruptured." first, let's start with the war in afghanistan. do you think it is worth fighting? a "the washington post" abc news poll says 2/3 of americans say it is not. the numbers -- we also have a line set up for active duty military. you can also e-mail us and we are on twitter. we will read your tweets on the air this morning. this is the story in "the washington post" yesterday looking at the war in afghanistan. "the afghan war is not worth fighting, most in the u.s. say." host: what do you think? is the war in afghanistan worth fighting? do you think it has been productive so far? if you think this time for a pullout? fairfax, virginia. jack joins us. good morning. caller: good morning. i had a comment about the war and one other comment. i do not think it is worth fighting. we're spending $2 billion per week and countless companies are just taking this money. it cannot be accounted for. that is why i think the republicans are all four wards because t
night here in japan. the snows were very heavy around the most seriously affected areas. so you have all the people without heat, without electricity. food and water supplies remain very low as do gas supplies. it is tough for people to get around, although they did have some buses of people, evacuees they were able to take out of the immediate area. and they're continuing to test people, including babies for radiation contamination. but red cross workers, other international aid organizations, they're being very cautious right now. they have actually pulled back a little farther away from the nuclear plant. obviously they want to protect the health and safety of their workers as they try to deal with this humanitarian crisis. thomas? >> chris jansing in tokyo for us. chris, thanks so much. >>> the radiation released from nuclear power plants raises concerns about whether wind conditions will spread the radiation to other regions. jennifer car fog kncarfagno has tracking the winds for us. let's talk about what chris was reporting about the dangerous freezing temperature s that some peopl
: "fox and friends" starts right now. >> martha: the last on the story out of japan. workers in the failed nuclear physicists riactor site are getting set to go back to work. one report said the workers niver left that site and then reports that they evacuated 50 corgous people who were staying there to try to cool the nuclear physicists reactors . we have had conflicting reports. >> brian: four of those men are missing. they were working on one of the reactors. we'll follow up on that. >> martha: unbelievable story . new pictures show at least two of the plant's reactors are completely destroyed . we have seen the araeil shots . trying to figure out what to do next to prevent a complete meltdown there. >> brian: when tempco was fulling -- pulling out the prime minister demanded what was going on and demanded they go back. >> steve: we'll go to ykoto air force base. david piper is standing by. >>reporter: the new crisis piraling oust control. in a desperate move japanese military helicopter was sent up with a huge bucket of water to dump it on the fukushima plant. they had to
and frayed nerves. the latest from japan. how is the radiation in that country now different from what you absorb every day? and they put the squeeze on pro-democracy demonstrators and a look at where the obama administration stands. live from the studio in washington. this is "special report." i'm bret baier. the news from japan continues to be mostly bad. but there was a positive note today, as the owner of the crippled nuclear plant says the new power line is almost done that will enable the restart of electric powered pumps and possibly a solution to the overheating crisis. elevated radiation levels have been detected outside the 20-mile emergency perimeter. the head of the u.s. nuclear agency says there is no more water in the spent fuel pool at the reactor plant. greg palkot is live in teak owe where it's just -- tokyo where it's just after 7:00 in the morning. good morning, greg. what does this mean? >> hey, bret. it's actually pretty serious. in fact, one of the worst case scenarios that have been bandied about. if true, the rods could get hotter and hotter and meltdown and shower
they're there. >> and in japan, tsunami ghost town. a study that was -- city that was once home to 10,000 abandoned by rescuers. i'll talk to one of the few people left behind. this is a special live edition of "piers morgan tonight" in new york. good evening. more and more extraordinary videos are emerging from libya today. most of them shocking in their graphic violence. they show how desperate the battle for the country has become. take a look at this. [ crowd noise ] [ gunfire ] >> cnn can't independently confirm where and when these videos were shot. our best information is that this one shows street fighting in tripoli and benghazi in recent days. as you can see, the fighting escalates from gunshots to hand-to-hand combat. we also have this very disturbing video which appears to show the bodies of an entire family killed in misurata. it was uploaded to youtube earlier today. tonight we're covering breaking news all over the globe. live reports from the very best of cnn's correspondents from the middle east to japan. >>> we begin with the crisis in libya. and two leaders head to
been talked -- touched by the magnitude until this disaster are closely following the events in japan and the repercussions in this country and in many other countries. before we begin, i would like to offer my sincere condolences to all of those who have been affected by the earthquake and the tsunami in japan. our hearts go out to all lead in dealing with the aftermath of these natural disasters. we are mindful of a long and difficult road they will face in recovering. we know the people of japan are resilience and strong and we have every confidence that they will come through this difficult time and move forward with resolved to rebuild their vibrant country. i believe i speak for all americans when i say that we stand together with the people of japan at this most difficult and challenging time. the nrc is a relatively small agency. we play a critical role in protecting american people and the environment when it comes to the use of nuclear materials. we have our inspectors to work full time as every nuclear plant in the country and we are proud to have world top scientists, engi
. immediately you get the question, you design against those, but look at japan. if you had an earthquake with a magnitude of nine, how does one answer that question? you could always have and 9.5 occur. is there a rational way of addressing that? >> my explanation is one i know you understand. we look that up faults around the u.s. and have that information's. look at the historical record, but that the maximum earthquake, and with everything we do, we add margins, but we also looked at the specific location in relation to the fault. we considered the kinds of soil and rock formations between the fault location and the site, and analysis to see the ground motion that would actually be seen at the site. and we design for an earthquake of a certain size. i am falling into the trap of saying of a certain size, of the ground motion of a certain magnitude. having said that, with all these other things, severe accident management guideline, the b five b procedures, we have procedures and equipment in place that says, even if we were wrong and the plant suffered this serious event, we have in f
their involvement, allowing for no troops on the ground. the libyan story, japan story, and the budget situation at home. the continuing resolution that punts the decisions on the budget until the beginning of april. they left town this friday morning. we would like to hear which of these stories are most important to you this friday morning. let's begin with a call from san antonio, texas. robert on the independent line. caller: am i on? good morning. i wanted to say that the most significant story i believe is what is happening in the middle east with all of these uprisings and the people wanting democracy. i find it very significant, even though all of these things are happening across the world like japan, i find this very significant because even though america has not intervened with these countries to try to make than democracies, they themselves have tried to make themselves free of dictators and other powers that they did not have control of. host: robert, what do you think of this particular instance with the united nations out suggesting military force is appropriate in libya? caller:
and responsibly. information is still coming in about the events unfolding in japan, but the administration is committed to learning from japan's experience as we work to continue to strengthen america's nuclear industry. >> rose: and then by telephone, ethan brawner of the "new york times" in bahrain. >> it's hard to imagine how they can get back out in the streets quickly. the tanks and the jeeps are out this very important places in great strength. again, on the other hand, bahrain really relies on the financial district and so on to have a normal life, and i think that they're going to have to end the curfew and the marshal law quality at some point. >> rose: we conclude this evening with a look at the continuing crisis in the middle east and north africa with rob malley, john negroponte, and zalmay khalilzad. >> i think what mrs. : clts has done, secretary clinton, has been to hold back on the idea of us stepping forward unilaterally on this but saying, look, if we get the requisite support from the international community, including the arab league, then the predicate has been set for
. we find ourselves with the world's most under reported story, a massive humanitarian crisis in japan caused by the quake and the following tsunami. what we could all be doing to help. dancing there? how about eating soup to get there? campbell's soups fill you with good nutrition, farm-grown ingredients, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. her morning begins with arthritis pain. that's a coffee and two pills. the afternoon tour begins with more pain and more pills. the evening guests arrive. back to sore knees. back to more pills. the day is done but hang on... her doctor recommended aleve. just 2 pills can keep arthritis pain away all day with fewer pills than tylenol. this is lara who chose 2 aleve and fewer pills for a day free of pain. and get the all day pain relief of aleve in liquid gels. and fewer pills for a day free of pain. but you can still refinance to a fixed rate as low as 4.75% at, where customers save an average of $293 a month. call lending tree at... today. [ male announcer ] when you have plaque psoria
cuisinart. >> caught on air, disaster in japan, 11:00 p.m. eastern eastern on msnbc. you can have the last word online at our blog, and follow my tweets at lawrence. "the rachel maddow show" is up next. sitting in tonight, chris haze. good evening. >> good evening. thank you for staying with us the next hour. rachel has the night off. >>> the nuclear crisis in japan is still volatile tonight. there have been numerous developments today. we'll get to those shortly. we begin with something you should never have to ask, something that should never be a question. are we at war? yes, we are at war in iraq and afghanistan, and maybe sort of in pakistan as well. but are we at war again in another middle eastern country? it is not a provocative rhetorical question, it is one so-called no fly zone over libya and to take all necessary measures to protect civilians under attack. faced with threat from moammar gadhafi of a massacre of his own civilians, united nations approved military action against libya, which is a big fricking deal. for us, for the united nations, for the region. yet what
in the grapevine. nuclear fallout in japan is now as bad as the three-mile incident but what does that incident but what does that mean? >> brett: they say conditions at the damaged plant in japan are grave but not badly deteriorating. but they raised the crisis from a four to a five on seven-point scale that puts it on par with the three-mile island incident. they sprayed water for a second day as officials continued their efforts to lay emergency power line to reconnect the cooling system. greg palkot has the latest. >> reporter: in earthquake zone in northeastern japan, in tokyo and around the country there was a minute of silence one week after the devastating earthquake and tsunami hit. japanese prime minister spoke to his people. we are going to create from japan from scratch, its strong resolve we all must share. there was strong resolve with stricken reactors in the quake zone. fire engines were used to douse the overheating facilities. electric lines are hoped to be operative this weekend. firemen were getting to join other embattled workers and government finally admitted that it as b
would not be able to handle a nuclear emergency similar to the events unfoiledding in japan. however, administrator craig fugate told a senate committee yesterday the government as a whole is better prepared to deal with emergencies than it was before hurricane katrina. also testifying, the former inspector general who assessed fema operations since the hurricane. this is about two hours. >> the hearing will come to order. i thank everyone for their patience. as you know we had two votes on the floor. so we delayed the start of the hearing. i welcome, everyone. we convene this hearing which had been long-planned, long-scheduled on fema's ability to respond to a major catastrophe against the compelling backdrop of the tragically catastrophic events unfolding in japan. an earthquake and tsunami in rapid succession that have already resulted in twice as many deaths as al qaeda's attack on america on 9/11. of course no one believes that the death, and finding of the dead is over yet. the earthquake and tsunami have also caused fires and explosions at nuclear power plants that could have
>>> good morning. breaking news. a surge in radiation levels at the crippled nuclear plant in japan forces emergency crews to evacuate overnight. while they are now getting back to work, there are new fears that those 50 heroic workers could be running out of options today, wednesday, march 16, 2011. r captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good morning. welcome to "today" on a wednesday morning. i'm matt lauer. >> good morning, everyone. i'm savannah guthrie. meredith is on assignment. you just think about the pressure those workers must be under, the sacrifice they may be making. they are being dubbed the fukushima 50, one of the last lines of defense against an all-out meltdown. >> imagine the concern when they were temporarily pulled from the plant overnight after radiation levels spiked for a short term. another concern, the second fire reactor number four today, where spent fuel rods are being stored. >> in a rare appearance, japan's emperor delivered a televised address saying he was, quote, deeply worried, but urged people not to give up hope. we are going to have
as they were assembling last night. it is all but eclipsed by japan and the earthquake followed by the tsunami. guest: i just came back from japan as a part of a congressional exchange program. they are good allies. they have been an active member of the six-party talks in the region which is so very essential. this is just devastating. when you read the reports after you just met so many members and their leadership and you have been in their homes and you have had such in-depth discussions over three or four days, to see this happening is just devastating. japan is probably one of the most organized places i have ever visited. the streets are clean. the people are polite. there is a plan for everything that has to happen. i know that they have been preparing for a possible earthquake or tsunami for a long time. preparing for it and then responding when the tall buildings are shaking and people are losing their lives, hopefully the lives lost will be kept to a minimum because of the preparations. host: this is also a domestic story. the waves are beginning to reach the coastline in hawaii. it
bargaining law from taking effect and nuclear fallout from japan gets an upgrade. live from our studio in washington is special report. >> brett: u.s. ambassador susan rice says muammar khadafy is in violation of resolution that demanded a cease-fire in libya. they called on khadafy to halt military attacks on civilians and if the libyan leader does not stand down, the u.s. will launch military action against him. but he said the summit will not send ground troops into the country. we have team coverage. doug is at the pentagon with the u.s. role and logistics of implementing a no-fly zone. we begin with senior correspondent with rick leventhal who is live in libya in benghazi. >> reporter: it's safe to say that we've seen more check points popping up, more young men with small arms and concern about khadafy's army with libyan official on live television saying that the army was actually on the outskirts of this city, but was not planning to come in. this after reports that the cease-fire was followed by heavier fire from khadafy's army against civilians and soldiers rebel fighters. we
him. so now he is in something -- like crabs coming out of japan, being pulled down by everyone. what is right? what is wrong? president bush was too fast to go into war. they say he is too slow. he is going to take his time to see if he is right and do the right thing by people, not just black people, ever ready. this man loves everybody. you got white people that created this mess and that is coming down on him like he did it. something is wrong with this world. we see things going on and look at it in an abstract way. was notthis war started by president obama. we did not start having money shortage from president obama. he is the first black african american president. you white people sitting around a pole and give your opinion about things. -- around tables and give your opinions about things. you always have done best. this. guehost: our thanks to al- jazeera that is showing us what is going on in libya. from "the new york times", the allies open the air assault on gaddafi forces. residents interviewed. there was heavy fighting and the city center and pro-gaddafi snipers could
-moon on the earthquake and tsunami in japan. he said they will do everything to help japan. we'll have that live on c-span2. in the meantime, anita in "washington journals" he's the ranking member on the subcommittee that covers foreign operations. >> host: thanks for being here. >> guest: my pleasure. >> host: wow, we have a lot going on today. i'm going to start with libya just because the secretary was talking about it. again leaders why europe are meeting, france is pushing for a no-fly zone. what are your thoughts about the u.s. involvement level? how big should it be? and why is that a good investment for this country? >> guest: it's clear to me after discussing it in depth with secretary clinton is the administration is actively involved in strategy sessions and discussions with the international community. the united states cannot act independently. and people may say no-fly zone, they may say -- they may come up with all kinds of actions, but number one, there are implication implications as secretary gates said to every one the proposals. unless we act with the international community, i do
this morning of some of the aftermath of the tsunami in japan. you can see the flooding and fighters. let me show you a couple of other pictures. this is from china. look at the floating vehicles submerged and the flooded streets in the miyagi region of japan. this is what it was like for people in a bookstore in a japanese city as the ceiling started to fall in the aftermath of the earthquake. big, international story affecting millions of people on the pacific rim and lots of news coverage will be coming out as the death tolls become clear and also the damage. we are going to talk national politics today and we want to move to wisconsin. with the union vote in the assembly, the legislation is now sent to the governor for a signature. a reporter for "the wisconsin state journal" is on the phone with us. tell us about what the mood was like inside the chamber as the legislation passed. guest: hostile. there was about an hour or two of debate yesterday. the republicans called off debate and voted as they filed out of the chamber. their democratic colleagues, along with some protesters shouted
, cnn, atlanta. >>> with the japan nuclear disaster on everyone's mind these days, we want to show you where the united states actually ranks when it comes to alternative energies. stay with us. use magnesium, an ingredient that works more naturally with your colon than stimulant laxatives, for effective relief of constipation without cramps. thanks. [ professor ] good morning students. today, we're gonna... hi. i'm dan hesse, ceo of sprint. the other day, i looked up the word "unlimited" in the dictionary. nowhere in the definition did i see words like... "metering," "overage," or "throttling"... which is code for slowing you down. only sprint gives you true unlimited calling, texting... surfing, tv, and navigation on all phones. why limit yourself? [ male announcer ] sprint. the only national carrier to give you true unlimited. find out more at trouble hearing on the phone? visit introducing the most fuel-efficient luxury car available. the radically new 42 mile per gallon ct hybrid from lexus. welcome to the darker side of green. see your lexus dealer. >
you would get on an intercontinental flight, going here from europe, say, or here from japan. i'm going to japan next week and i will get more radiation on my flight to japan next week than you will get from drinking any of this milk that they're seeing now. >> wow that is interesting. the epa stepping up monitoring. certainly want to watch these radiation levels. is there a way that we can know for sure, really, that it's safe? even though it's nice to than they're watching it, but -- >> well, the epa has got very good systems for looking at this, and we're getting ahead of the curve here. where we ran into problems at chernobyl where i was working years ago, was they didn't get monitoring fast enough. they didn't get ahead of the curve. we're way ahead of the curve on this. the epa has the ability to do this, we're going to be able to prevent anything from happening here in the united states and in the near term. >> i wanted to talk more with you about this. i know that a lot of people have questions about this and i do as well. only halfway through my list for you, cham. we'l
an in japan there was a man who liked hunting. he told a lie to a bird. or a small light. small harrons make good friends or not. you might find the answer in my story. >> good afternoon. what are you up to these days anything exciting? yes, i have an idea. >> are you going to be the hunter in >> you told on me you're going to be unicorn hunter. it's a kind of snake kind of hunt er japan. you ever seen them. it was a stupid idea. just the one. the japanese proverb says. my prompt cart. please listen. okay. go ahead. i go to where many harrons come to feed. i walled out to one of him in a loud voice like this. [yelling] hello mr. onin. what will the herring think? well i wonder what he wants. i understand he wants to capture me. well, what should i do. no. i can get away easy any time but i think silly man. i don't know this him and so just before he catches me. i can escape. this is going to be fun. i need to get closer to him and call word to him. hello mr. harold will think. i need to get closer and closer to the herring and call to him in this way. hello mr. herring. the herring will t
countries? if there is any other country i would move to, it would be japan because they are such a great country. i want to say that we do not need to by our friends via financial aid. this is ridiculous. host: we do not need to by our friends. guest: is a matter of developing or alliances, working together in the interest of the united states of america. in haiti, when there is poverty and people do not have homes or a place to live, it is not a matter of buying our friends but to make sure we can bring stability in the country because they are right on our border. the same thing with mexico. people travel everywhere and we are all interconnected. i hope that in addition to suppor >> in about 20 minutes we will take you live to the white house for a news conference with president obama. among the possible topics, libya and the impact of the sue tsunan the west coast. live coverage when it starts, scheduled now for 12:30 eastern, and can we'll have that here on c-span2. a new member of congress, kevin yoder, a freshman representative from kansas who also sits on the gop's appropriations
this month. usa today has a story about the situation in japan growing and have an impact here in the united states. we will talk about exports and imports and how this plays into japan later on in the program. before our last phone call, i want to show you what colonel gaddafi had to say late yesterday evening about the situation in libya. >> all the muslim armies have to take part in this battle against the crusaders. their protest all over the world to help you come in asia, and africa, in america, in europe. they are people against their own leaders. we will been -- we will win, we will be victorious, we will not surrender. host: an independent in north carolina, your the last phone call. what do you think? caller: thank god for c-span and. i am from south carolina, and only heard it once, our leaders met behind closed doors, which is illegal. i keep hearing about going to cut, going to cut. i walked into my nearby pharmacy and they didn't know and i did not know that my medicaid had been cut. and they were not -- i'm a diabetic with kidney failure, but i could not get my insulin pills o
come back from a trip to japan. we're now here in washington talking as we tape this. you were there to cover another extraordinary story overseas. what i am trying to understand is, why did you make that trip? if you answer me, because it was a great story, that is done enough. you have so many responsibilities that cut into a decision. why you do that? why did you make the trip to japan? >> i wish i could say that it was a science and theory. a lot of it is, i feel compelled to go. it is not his that i covered the tsunami in indonesia or southeast asia, but i felt it was a story i had to experience tangibly. this incredible constellation of disasters -- at that moment, i felt there was a reason for the entire broadcast to be there. part of being an anchor is a decision, where are your best their anchoring? the anchor of a really race. -- relay race. when is the best for you to take the whole broadcasting go overseas? it does change that balance. in the middle east, there were a host of correspondence to rivera and you were fantastic. " -- who were there and who worked fantast
and tsunami story. the associated press has just announced and msnbc has tweeted that japan is issuing an evacuation order to thousands of residents near a nuclear power plant. certainly, we will keep an eye on this. we will keep an eye on breaking news. this is a big day for people who are following what is going on in the world. jobs. i pulled the baltimore sun because it is typical of what is going on a run the country. home sales rising. we look at your own on and on the rate in kansas and kansas city and the city itself. what is happening with jobs in your district? against coke the job numbers that you are refering to -- guest: the job numbers that you are referring to -- the economy is probably stronger -- keep tax rates low and below regulatory environment in kansas. we try to foster innovation through small businesses. we try to be very welcome to capital and growth. one of the things we are focused on in the kansas city is bioscience. host: arthur government subsidies supporting that? ? there are research dollars the come to our university. as i said, we are making these redu
security council. and to add additional at-on sanctions from our partners, including the e.u., japan, and others. when you are trying to sanction iran, no matter how powerful you are and how much we can do, it is imperative that we get the international community to support it. otherwise, there is too much leakage. we have limited that, and i feel strongly that we are making an impact. >> thank you, and i request written responses that you offered to the questions that you are not able to answer because i have so many, including the deposition of the libyan officials, which is so timely. my good friend, the ranking member. >> i want to commend my colleagues on the committee the speech that secretary clinton gave in addition to her estimate -- excellent testimony, but yesterday, going to the human rights council, where she discussed libya, iran, and other issues come up quite a remarkable presentation, particularly in pointing out ypocrisy of ouriran's condemnations of libya. i would like asked -- try to get into issues in this short time. one, the israeli-palestinian process. the que
also non-governmental organizations, look at the regulatory commissions. i think japan is quite a democratic country. it will take awhile to get all the information out of it. in this country, active citizen participation -- go to nuclear regulatory commission hearings. you can comment on all kinds of things. i recently commented on an n.r.c. regulations and rules. it is possible, but i think you have to be vigilant. host: grace writes to us on twitter asking about a ban on nuclear power plants. sharon squassoni, thank you so much for joining us this morning. she is the program director for proliferation prevention at the center for strategic & international studies. let's go now to the floor of the house of representatives, where the session is getting underway. thanks for joining us today. ker. the clerk: the speaker's room, washington, d.c., march 16, 2011. i hereby appoint the honorable renee ellmers to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of janua
candidate. he talked about the pentagon budget and japan's nuclear power crisis. this was hosted by the ideal love republican party in davenport. it's 25 minutes. >> thank you very much. congratulations on this. it happened i got to speak at the first state party event at the chairman some of you may remember in july and in 2009 with the rising stars. the great event, read energy, great fun, and i told people at home he is going to be first-rate chairman. i picked up the three, and a former county chairmen. i was the county chairmen in my county twice, once for four years and once for six years and i'm going to just tell you this is where the elections were won. they were here where the rubber meets the road. >> judy, thank you for the work that you do. [applause] >> i would be here on march 15th, but i not going to have anybody to stand behind me. >> i'm really glad to be here for the kickoff the series speaker event because we are getting ready for something very important. the 2012 election is going to be a watershed election in american history. matt didn't go into all of my
friend and ally japan. i spoke with members of the foreign affairs and ministry of justice regarding the fact that japan has become a destination country, a haven for international child abductions. our foreign service officers and consul general were extremely sympathetic. at least 171 children and 131 broken hearted parents are worried sick and have no access to see their children. all of us want japan to sign the hague convention on international child deduction. that treaty will not solve the current cases. they stand at great risk of being left behind a second time. what is the administration's plan to resolve the current cases? on at least five occasions, president obama has met with them. did he raise the issue of those children and their left behind parents? since 1979, brothers and sisters have been illegal in china as part of the bar. one child per couple policy. for over 30 years, the you and public relations -- the u.n. population fund has supported and celebrated the mass of crimes against humanity. the facts are uncontested. any chinese or to that woman without -- or ti
an impression, barbara, about how news of japan sinks into one of the most seismically active country in the world? it's a good question. a lot of my iranian friends have been very afraid about the brashear. -- brashear reactor. i had one friend tell me it's such a hodgepodge of technology. the germans started it in the 1970's and you have chinese bits, russian bits that they're afraid if you plug it in you're afraid the whole thing's beginning to to blow up anyway. now you have japan. it's a very cautionary tale for the iranians. you notice brashear as that -- has not opened. i would bet that it's going to be a while before that reactor starts up if it ever does and if they don't have a functioning nuclear power plant, why do they need all these lower enriched uniform for? -- uranium for? that's in favor as well as all the other problems that's going on, the assassinations of nuclear scientists and so on. it definitely could be a factor in suggesting that they might slow down. i don't think they're going to give up their determination to have a pro
aspiration of the iranians for a long time. do you had the impression, barbara, how news of japan at that didn't one of the most seismically active countries in the world? >> a lot my iranian friends have been wary of the it bashir reactor opening. the german started in the 1970's, and you have chinese and russians, but if you plug it into the whole thing will blow up anyway. and now you have had japan. it is a very cautionary tale for the iranians. bashir has not opened. there were problems with the fuel rods, some say sabotage of the pumps. i think it will be awhile before the reactor starts up, if it ever does. if they do not have a functioning power plant, what did they mine all of the -- in range all the or uranium for? -- what did dave enrich all of the uranium for? it could be a factor in projecting that they might slow down. i do not think they will give up their determination on those who have a program and to say that they have a right to the program. that as a nationalistic issue. they will not go away. >> that is a lesson not just for iran but for the entire middle eas
informed. but there is just so much going on right now, what with japan and libya, the 2012 presidential race that half an hour just isn't enough. even if i leave out all the facts. so tonight, i'm going to cover it all at once. colonel gadhafi announced he's going to travel to iowa to dump sea water on the nuclear reactors which were attacked by france and england in retaliation for the earthquake, which polls show is the most qualified candidate. >> all right. welcome to "morning joe." it is 6:00 on the east coast. too bad we're not there. good morning. it's thursday, march 24th. joe and i are in los angeles again this morning. what time is it here? >> it's 1:15. here in los angeles, elizabeth taylor passed away. they are asking whether elizabeth taylor may have been the biggest movie star ever. of course, america will be remembering her over the next few days. >> she might have been. >> there is for so many reasons, through so many decades she was married to john warner, a senator. but he was number four or five. but also, of course, in the '60s and '70s. most really, most associated
point. you recently come back from a trip to japan. we're now here in washington talking as we tape this. you were there to cover another extraordinary story overseas. what i am trying to understand is, why did you make that trip? if you answer me, because it was a great story, that is done enough. -- a that is not enough. you have so many responsibilities that cut into a decision. it costs a lot to send you and a group of people overseas. why you do that? why did you make the trip to japan? >> i wish i could say that it was a science and theory. to go. it is not his that i covered the tsunami in indonesia or southeast asia, but i felt it was a story i had to experience tangibly. this incredible constellation of disasters -- at that moment, i felt there was a reason for the entire broadcast to be there. part of being an anchor is a decision, where are your best their anchoring? the anchor of a relay race. when is the best for you to take the whole broadcasting go overseas? it does change that balance. in the middle east, there were a host of correspondence who were there and who were fan
is and the melting nuclear melting in japan shows how perilous our dependence on nuclear power is and they underscore our failure to have a broad based energy portfolio and our failure to have a rational look at our energy usage. mr. russo, - to set prices are determined by supply and demand globally, and several of you have said that sort of thing. let me ask i guess the first mr. newell, what is the scale and let's put it in perspective here of possible short term energy production. i mean, suppose there were a lot more leases for offshore drilling released in the last couple of years to hear the curious oppose or even a in the drilling on private land. what is the scale of the increase in production we might achieve compared to what opec can do by turning defaults up and down in the short term? >> welcome there is a considerable lag in the increased access resources and an expiration and the element and the ultimate protection of the resources so there's an important issue would return to the time scale which i think you mentioned in the short run to respond to the immediate impact send crude oil
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 92 (some duplicates have been removed)